Archive for family law

Why you should watch “Marriage Story” on Netflix

Promotional Poster from Netflix Film Marriage Story directed by Noah Baumbach and starring Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson

Theatrical Release Poster*

Most divorce professionals have “seen this movie before” in their own practices.

As a divorce professional for the last 20 years, I’ve been involved in more than one ugly divorce as I am sure you can imagine.  The stories are similar and seem to go one of two ways.  Either the parties get to a place where they can work through their differences out of court or the case devolves into a nightmare scenario where parents give up all control to a broken adversarial legal system.

The second option of the completely messed up divorce experience is powerfully portrayed in Marriage Story, now streaming on Netflix.  With a fantastic screenplay by Noah Baumbach, the film is the recipient of multiple Oscar nominations such as best actress, best actor, best picture, best supporting actress, best original screenplay and best original music score.  It’s a tour de force of acting prowess that made the critics very happy.  Marriage Story shines a light on the emotional trauma an adversarial process can cause when parties cede control of their families to the judicial system.

Our protagonists, Charlie (played by Adam Driver) and Nicole (played by Scarlett Johansson) are an artsy theater couple living in New York with an 8-year-old son.  We learn quickly that they are trying for an amicable split, but after a disastrous meeting with a less than competent mediator, things go pretty far south.  Mom moves to LA to reboot her acting career while Dad stays in New York.  While in LA, Mom hires a shark of an attorney in the form of Laura Dern.  What follows is the typical sorrow, pain and emotional destruction of the adversarial litigated divorce.

(An aside: The scene with the bumbling mediator would be great to use in a mediation training as an example of what a mediator should NOT do.)

Emotional Ambiguity is “Par for the Course” in Family Law

While the film gets some of the law not quite right, it nails the ambiguity and conflict experienced by a couple in divorce who are estranged yet still have good feelings somewhere- even if buried deeply.  In reality, when people marry and especially when there are children, there is a thread of positive in the feelings even when there is hurt and anger from a divorce.  I have learned as a family law mediator that the more tightly and deeply a person buries the good feelings for their ex, the greater the remaining love actually is.  Betrayal and hurt from a person one loves stings much more acutely than when it’s a person one cares less for.

Uncovering that Remnant of Good Feeling

Sometimes a remedy mediators use to find accord is to help the parties find that string of good feeling that remains – no matter how difficult to find and how small it is.  Litigation does the opposite. It creates new negative feelings and wounds unnecessarily, which chokes out the possibility for positivity and accord.

Divorce Litigation Disempowers

Further, divorce litigation takes control away from the parties.  It is disempowering, emasculating, demoralizing, debilitating and impoverishing. One particular scene in the film shows the lawyers arguing in the courtroom in front of a judge while Charlie and Nicole watch helplessly.  The attorneys take simple mistakes or misunderstandings and elevate them into unmitigated crimes against humanity.  While their horror is clear, they seem transfixed and paralyzed as the mutual assured destruction continues.

I’ve learned that such hyperbole argued in a courtroom tends to accomplish little.  One wise practitioner once warned me that it is rare for a person to be as horrible as portrayed by the ex spouse.  Insults hurled across the court room tend to boomerang.  This truth holds: water seeks its own level.  Said more coarsely, “Mother Teresa doesn’t marry Hitler.”

So, if you are a divorce practitioner, you owe it to your clients to watch this film as a window into what is going on when you aren’t there- the unintended consequences of a less than careful application of our craft.  If you are contemplating a divorce or are in the throws of divorce conflict, you owe it to yourself and your children to watch this film so you can be alerted to the dangers and pitfalls that may befall you without taking care.  As I always tell my prospective clients, the decision of HOW you divorce is almost as important as the decisions TO divorce.

*Note:  The Marriage Story Theatrical Release Poster shown above is believed to belong to the distributor of the film, Netflix, the publisher of the film or the graphic artist.  We use the image in this blog post to serve as the primary means of visual identification at the tip of the article dedicated to the work in question. 

Minimal Use: The image is used for identification in the context of critical commentary of the work, product or service for which it serves as poster art. It makes a significant contribution to the user’s understanding of the article, which could not practically be conveyed by words alone. The image is placed at the top of the article discussing the work, to show the primary visual image associated with the work, and to help the user quickly identify the work, product or service and know they have found what they are looking for. Use for this purpose does not compete with the purposes of the original artwork, namely the creator providing graphic design services, and in turn the marketing of the promoted item.  In fact, the use in this blog post serves to promote paid viewing of the film in question.

 

 

Forgiveness During Divorce: A key to finding peace

Shawn Weber Offers Back to School Advice for Divorced Parents on NBC 7 San Diego

*Note:  The Marriage Story Theatrical Release Poster shown above is believed to belong to the distributor of the film, Netflix, the publisher of the film or the graphic artist.  We use the image in this blog post to serve as the primary means of visual identification at the top of the blog post dedicated to the work in question and as a featured image on this blog. 

Minimal Use: The image is used for identification in the context of critical commentary of the work, product or service for which it serves as poster art. It makes a significant contribution to the user’s understanding of the article, which could not practically be conveyed by words alone. The image is placed at the top of the article discussing the work, to show the primary visual image associated with the work, and to help the user quickly identify the work, product or service and know they have found what they are looking for. Use for this purpose does not compete with the purposes of the original artwork, namely the creator providing graphic design services, and in turn the marketing of the promoted item.  In fact, the use in this blog post serves to promote paid viewing of the film in question.

Divorce and Recession Fears: What’s Your Divorce Recession Risk Score?

By Shawn Weber, CLS-F and Mark Hill, CFP, CDFA

The impact of a divorce, especially a gray divorce, can be amplified and made more complex in a recession.

The headlines are troubling. Donald Trump’s escalating trade war with China, no signs of a Brexit deal in Europe and unrest in Hong Kong are all making the world’s stock markets nervous. Global gross domestic product is falling, and recession fears are rising as we approach what will be the first economic downturn since the Great Recession of 2009 in the next 18 months.

Interest rates are sending an early warning. Ever since the U.S. two-year/ten-year yield curve inverted on August 14, the news media are a flutter about a possible looming recession. Every recent recession has been accurately preceded by this economic milestone.

NOTE: If you need a primer on the Inverted Yield Curve,  read the Forbes article by Carmine Gallo, “How The Finance Prof Who Discovered The ‘Inverted Yield Curve’ Explains It To Grandma.”

Many knowledgeable financial experts believe we are heading for a recession. There’s some disagreement about timing, but there is consensus our economy behaves cyclically.

We’ve been enjoying an unusually long ten-year economic expansion. Things have been going great, but eventually the law of gravity applies and what goes up comes down. Markets periodically correct. It’s not a question of whether a recession is in our future, it’s a question of when and how deep it will be.

Family law professionals witnessed the devastating  effects of  the Great Recession on clients. While an upcoming recession is unlikely to be as staggeringly awful as in 2009, there are some important lessons for people considering a divorce in the near future.

If you fall into the “Grey Divorce” category (people choosing to end their marriage in their 50s or later), you could be even more vulnerable and need to pay extra attention. If you have created retirement portfolios and diligently invested, assumptions by you and your financial advisors regarding future returns and safe withdrawal rates may suddenly no longer be valid.

What Is Your Divorce Recession Risk?

If you own a business, a recession could have a significant impact on you and your family, especially if a divorce is on the horizon.

For people considering a divorce in uncertain financial times, understanding what happened in the last recession can inform your decision now.

Do you own a business? You have significant reason to be concerned. The 2009 experience showed us how recession can impact divorce decisions in two major areas: falling prices and declining income.

Falling Prices

Things that can go down in value include real estate, retirement accounts, stock accounts and business assets. When your assets decline in value, it impacts your divorce decisions. There simply will not be as much money to divide.

Declining Business Value: Are You Vulnerable? 

Is your business safe? Don’t answer too quickly.

In the last recession, people in the real estate and banking fields were shocked to be laid off. Next time, we see the potential for another round of U.S. business failures. It all comes down to too much debt. Since interest rates have been at historically low levels for a decade, and since banks like to lend in the good times, many businesses have become overleveraged.

The debt amassed in recent years is staggering, but even in today’s strong economy about 20 percent of U.S. companies still cannot make their loan interest payments from cashflow. The only way they can pay their interest is to constantly refinance. In a recession, this situation worsens, putting as many as another 20 percent of companies at risk. What happens if your sales drop in a recession, and you can’t get a loan to tide you over? Your company may not be as solid as you believe.

During the Great Recession, banks were not lending money.  They were even pulling existing loans, creating chaos for corporate finances. Banks are happy to lend money in good times, but in bad times they can get quite stingy with their lending. We could easily end up with nearly half of all American businesses having difficulty borrowing and unable to make loan payments. If they cannot borrow money to keep the doors open, they will go belly-up. By “they,” we could mean YOU.

Businesses of all sizes were devastated by the actions of their bankers in 2009. Companies failed, and workers were fired. In addition, many self-employed people who once ran strong, profitable businesses found they had nothing left.

In the next recession, we predict that the most vulnerable businesses will be those heavily involved in imports and exports, or in high technology. Trade wars create uncertainty which restricts buying and selling activity. With tech businesses, we are doing what America has a habit of doing: turning our heroes into goats.

How Healthy Are Your Retirement Assets?

Many people are not aware how vulnerable their retirement assets are to drops in the stock and bond markets. If the market loses value, your retirement assets lose value.

In an impending divorce, you need to assess whether your retirement plans can survive a recession. We believe you face the greatest risk if your portfolio is heavily exposed to technology companies, and businesses involved in import/export activities. Tip: if you own stock mutual funds, you are exposed.

Watch For Falling Real Estate Prices

Recent strength in the real estate market should not blind people to the reality of dropping prices. Current market strength is a result of the incredible low interest rates available. Although experts predict interest rates will remain low, even modestly higher rates can make real estate unattractive or even unaffordable. Many marriages have a significant amount of their net worth in the family home. When prices fall, there is less to divide, and sometimes not enough to live on.

Are Your Financial Assets in the Recession Crosshairs?

In a recession, nearly anything can happen.

In a recession, anything you own can decline in value. In some cases, property you count on selling and dividing in a divorce settlement won’t sell at any price you can accept. If your assets or employment are vulnerable to market forces, you may want to reconsider the timing of your looming divorce.

Loss of Income and Cash Flow

Are you vulnerable to a loss of cash flow due to recession?

Typically, recessions mess with people’s ability to pay their bills. With recession and divorce, people lose their liquidity in two key ways: loss of financing and loss of income. Additionally, when people already overspend, a loss of income or financing makes life all that much harder.

Preparing For A Loss of Access to Financing

In the last recession, banks became unwilling to make loans, including real estate and business loans.  Consider BEFORE a recession hits whether to borrow money now while lending is available. In 2009, we advised clients to pull money from their line of credit before the bank cancelled the line. It was good advice, because the clients were able to ensure they had cash before it became inaccessible.

What If Your Income Drops?

Consider carefully whether your business or your employer could be in the crosshairs. In the upcoming recession, the most vulnerable businesses will be those involved in the tech industry, manufacturing, farming or retail. Remember, if it costs more money to bring in or send out from the United States, manufacturers who rely on foreign trade will suffer and jobs will be lost.

Can You Handle a Change In Your Current Lifestyle?

If you enjoy spending money on luxury items to maintain a lavish lifestyle, it could come to a screeching halt in a recession – especially if a divorce is involved.

Many of our wealthier clients suffer from “affluenza.” People are feeling flush, consuming more and saving less. A recession will likely reduce income for many of these people. Costs will increase due to ongoing trade wars.

After a divorce, both clients will consume more. Two households cost more to maintain than one. When there is less money to go around and things cost more, families with higher spending patterns are hit much harder.

How will you balance your own needs together with the needs of your children? Will you be able to afford expensive activities for the kids like riding lessons or club sports? Something will have to give. How can you best prepare now?

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DivorceRecessionRisk

Take our Divorce Recession Risk Assessment Test

Is there a divorce in your near future?  Worried about the effect of recession on divorce could impact you? Learn your level of risk for suffering a serious financial hit if you divorce during a financial recession. It might change your thinking about your circumstances and how you want to proceed in the best interests of your family.

Guest Blogger Mark Hill, CFP®, CDFA

Mark Hill Divorce Financial ExpertA nationally-recognized speaker on the financial aspects of divorce, Mark Hill is the founder of Pacific Divorce Management.

With nearly 40 years as a financial planner and the last 20 years specializing in divorce, Mark is a wizard at cutting through the complication of the divorce finances. Mark is a luminary in the Collaborative Practice movement and brings his unique blend of financial expertise and dispute resolution skills to even the toughest divorce situations.

Pacific Divorce Management educates and provides guidance so divorcing couples can make informed decisions without feeling insecure about the consequences of those decisions. They gather, organize and evaluate the data and then tailor services to the clients’ needs.

At Weber Dispute Resolution, we love teaming up with Pacific Divorce Management to bring our clients superb financial advice for a secure future.  To learn more about how Mark Hill and Pacific Divorce Management can help you with your divorce case, visit PacDivorce.com or give Mark a call at 858-257-4612.

 

Read also:

Divorce Is Different On Rough Economic Seas – How a Recession Affects Divorce

Does Divorce Mediation Work for Complicated Financial Issues?

 

California Holds Facebook Rants In Custody Case Are ‘Free Speech’

facebook angerIt has been a long standing belief in family law: parents should not subject their kids to rants about a custody battle.

Judges have long constrained speech that would unnecessarily expose kids to the nastiness and details of the battle over who gets custody of the children between their  parents.

However, a new case issued by California Court of Appeal (Second Appellate District) seems to set a new boundary around what kind of speech the court can constrain.  It is particularly interesting given the new era of social media communication we live with today.

The case is Molinaro v. Molinaro 19 DJDAR 2709 (2-26-19) (DCA 2), certified for publication on March 28, 2019.

In this matter, a rather nasty Mr. Molinaro earned the privilege of receiving a domestic violence restraining order under the Domestic Violence Prevention Act (DVPA).  The list of his hideous behavior included blocking his wife’s car in the driveway, threatening to throw a chair through the window if she didn’t unlock the door, and threatening to euthanize the dog.  A real charmer.

Mr. Molinaro also endeared himself to the court by arguing with the judge, calling him ‘insane.’  He was so hostile at court, bailiffs had to repeatedly admonish him to calm down.

Mr. Molinaro posting rants about his ‘unfair’ treatment in the case on his Facebook page. Among other things, he posted “about the divorce, about everything that’s happening.” His soon to be ex-wife testified he “posted to Facebook that [she] stole $250,000 from [their] home equity line, that [she] used it all and ran away with it.”  She testified, “He says that I am crazy and having hallucinations.”

Court orders parties not to post on Facebook about their case

To protect the children from being exposed to their father’s Facebook rants about the case, the trial court ordered “Neither party is to discuss any aspect of the case with the minor children until further order of the court-including Facebook posting [about the] subject case matter.”

Granting the wife’s application for a restraining order, the court ordered her then-husband not “to post anything on Facebook … in regards to this action … ”  In an attachment to the restraining order, the court ordered the parties “not to post anything about the case on Facebook” and “not to discuss the case with the children.”

Mr. Molinaro appealed the trial court’s order.

Facebook posts considered to be “free speech” per the court ruling

The appellate court upheld all of the provisions of the restraining order, except for the restraint on Facebook posting, finding it to be an overbroad and impermissible infringement on free speech.

The court held:

“Although we have found the evidence sufficient to support the court’s issuance of a domestic violence restraining order, we conclude the part of the order prohibiting Michael from posting ‘anything about the case on Facebook’ is overbroad and impermissibly infringes upon his constitutionally protected right of free speech.”

The court further argued:

“’It is certainly in the best interests of the children of divorce that adults in their lives act in a mature and courteous manner’ [citation]; however, where a restraint on the freedom of speech is concerned, the restriction must be necessary and narrowly tailored to promoting those interests.  The part of the restraining order prohibiting Michael from posting about the case on Facebook does not meet this test.  We conclude it is overbroad, constituting an invalid prior restraint, and must be stricken from the domestic violence restraining order.”

So, to sum it up, Mr. Molinaro is still a jerk.  But he can talk about it on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

The California Prenuptial Agreement — Dotting the “i’s” and crossing the “t’s”.

multi-racial couple signing prenuptial agreement

Get your prenuptial agreement right!

California Prenuptial Agreement Rules Are Strict

I have seen A LOT of malpractice by otherwise supposedly competent lawyers in the area of prenuptial agreements. The California law for prenuptial agreements is fairly strict for what will pass muster and what will be thrown out. If you don’t get it right, your prenup won’t be worth the paper it is written on.

Here’s my “prenup formalities” checklist:

1.    The agreement must be in writing. California Family Code § 1611.

2.    The agreement must be executed voluntarily. California Family Code § 1615(a)(1).

3.    The parties must fully disclose information about debt and assets. California Family Code § 1615 (a)(2)(A).

4.    There must be a waiver of further disclosure expressly waiving, in writing, any right to disclosure of the property or debts of each spouse beyond the disclosure provided. The parties should execute this prior in time to the signing of the prenup. California Family Code § 1615(a)(2)(B).

5.    Both parties should have counsel.   Furthermore, each attorney should sign off on the prenuptial agreement. California Family Code § 1615 (c)(1). (Technically, California Family Code section 1615(c)(3) provides that a prenuptial agreement could be enforceable with only one attorney. However, it is harder and I don’t recommend it. I won’t do a prenup without lawyers on both sides.  That’s because the requirements to show that the other party was fully informed of rights and obligations is too onerous. Because it sets the single attorney up for a lawsuit, I simply won’t do it.)

6.    Both parties must have had no less than seven calendar days to review the prenuptial agreement between the time it is presented in final form and it is signed. California Family Code § 1615 (c)(2).

Download the free Weber Dispute Resolution Prenup Checklist HERE!

Notary?

Although the code does not specifically require it, I always notarize my prenuptial agreements. Another tactic is to follow the agreement up with a postnuptial agreement for reinforcement.

Do a postnuptial too

Different rules apply to postnuptial agreements. So, if a court throws out the prenuptial agreement under the premarital agreement act, the same document as a postnuptial agreement may save the day

Gotta have counsel

When you are contemplating your own prenuptial agreement, make sure you do it with an attorney. Don’t rely on an online service or a paralegal service to prepare your documents. Too much can go wrong and it is very easy for a court to throw out an agreement if it doesn’t meet the requirements of the code. Also, as mentioned above, don’t let your attorney fly solo on this. So, make sure the other party has counsel.

Get it right!

Again, I have seen a lot of attorneys go down in flames because an agreement ran afoul of the code. I have seen even more agreements go down in flames because the parties tried to do it without counsel. Word to the wise: Get it right.

Prenuptial Agreements Are on the Rise, And More Women Are Requesting Them

Great post with tips for couples planning cohabitation

I Have An Alimony Order in California – What is a ‘Gavron Warning’?

What is a Gavron Warning?

Paper family split between broken dollar heart with Alimony text

What is a Gavron Warning?

The idea of the “Gavron Warning” came from the case In Re Marriage of Gavron, (1988) 203 Cal.App.3d 705, 250 Cal.Rptr. 148. In this case, the parties separated in 1976 after a 25 year marriage. Subsequently, the court ordered the husband to pay $1,100 per month of alimony. He did so until 1981, when he asked the court to reduce support to $550 and then terminate entirely after one year. This initial request was denied.

However, the husband tried again in 1986. This time the court ordered that support would continue for five months and then terminate. The wife appealed and reversed the trial court’s order. The appellate court held that because the wife was not warned in prior orders to become self-sufficient, she could not be penalized years later because the court did not tell her to make efforts. In essence, as the court argued, the failure to focus her on the expectation to become self-sufficient meant that the court could not cut her support now.

Because of this case, the courts will frequently issue a warning to the supported spouse. Here is an example of a Gavron Warning:

“NOTICE: It is the goal of this state that each party will make reasonable good faith efforts to become self-supporting as provided for in Family Code section 4320. The failure to make reasonable good faith efforts may be one of the factors considered by the court as a basis for modifying or terminating spousal or partner support.”

Supporting Spouses will want the Gavron Warning included

So, the lesson for support payers is to make sure that the court includes such language in the spousal support order. If it is not, it may be harder to reduce income later if the supported spouse refuses to make good faith efforts to become self-sufficient. When I am representing a support payer, I always ask the judge for a Gavron Warning and I almost always include it in written stipulations. I will also sometimes simply file and serve a written Gavron Warning to the supported party myself at the beginning of the case so that there is no question that the supported party has been warned.

The supported spouse will likely rather not have the Gavron Warning included, but it is hard to oppose it

When I am representing a supported spouse, naturally I will not bring the Gavron Warning up. However, if opposing counsel wants it in an order, there is no legal basis to resist it. The moral for the supported spouse is not to count on the alimony as a permanent means of support.

I frequently refer the supported spouse for vocational counseling to assist with re-entering a career. I get as much alimony as I can, but encourage the prudence of planning for self-reliance. After all, no one knows for sure what the future holds. Not only could the support payer try to reduce alimony, it could simply terminate by means of death. Any changed circumstance such as unemployment or disability could force a reduction or termination in support too. The best advice is to use the support as a life preserver to stay afloat in the short run, but take steps immediately to be ready for when the support may no longer be available.

Further reading:

How California Spousal Support Works

What does California Child Support Cover?

 

 

Does Divorce Mediation Work for Complicated Financial Issues?

Complicated financial issues can make a divorce complicated. Mediation can help you sort out your issues.

Complicated financial issues can make a divorce seem complicated. Mediation can help you sort out your issues.

One common myth about divorce mediation deserves a debunking:  You can’t mediate when there are complicated financial issues. This advice is completely wrong. The opposite is true. The more complex your divorce finances, mediation offers the best way to sort them out without resorting to expensive litigation.

Comparing costly, stressful divorce litigation in court, and the same divorce process using mediation, these are the reasons why mediation can be a better choice for complicated fiancial situations.

Financial disclosure same for mediation as in court

Financial declarations in divorce cases are the same no matter whether you go to court, or pursue alternative dispute resolution.

Financial declarations in divorce cases are the same no matter whether you go to court, or pursue alternative dispute resolution.

Courts require the identical forms used in mediation. Parties complete an Income and Expense Declaration (FL-150) and a Schedule of Assets and Debts (FL-142). The law requires disclosure of all material facts and circumstances related to money – whether asked for or not.

Additionally, parties can have financial disclosures reviewed by counsel before agreeing to anything. Whether your divorce is simple or you have profoundly complicated financial issues, your divorce process will require full disclosure. There is no difference between mediation and litigation in the level of detail.

Because mediation relies on informal discovery rather than formal and expensive discovery, people actually tend to get more information in mediation than in litigation.

Lawyers know the name of the game when served with discovery in a litigated case is to provide as little information as legally possible.  It’s even more the case when there are complicated financial issues.  But in a mediation, the information tends to be more forthcomingbecause people are not being forced into tedious formal discovery processes.  This may seem counterintuitive, but actually it’s human nature.  When people are forced to do things they tend not to cooperate.  When things are more voluntary, people are less threatened and more likely to do what they are supposed to do.

Use a neutral financial specialist in mediation

The financial specialist can help gather information when there are complicated financial issues. Sometimes the parties may not know which questions to ask relating to the divorce finances.  The financial specialist can help know what questions need to be asked and can also alert parties to red flags.  This is especially helpful when the parties are at different levels of knowledge relating to the finances.  The financial specialist helps bring people to a level playing field.  Reports that the financial specialists produce can be very helpful in uncovering options and finding pathways to settlement.

Mediation lets you be creative with solutions for your divorce finances

Judges must follow the law. The law isn’t flexible. Judges have limited options to offer you. But when people mediate, they are free to create a settlement best for the family.

I have seen many “outside-the-box” settlements in mediation. Most are far better for the family than what a court could ever provide.

Get independent legal and financial advice

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There is no risk in mediation. Parties are not required or pressured to enter into any agreements without the option to talk with a lawyer before signing. You can have an agreement reviewed by your own financial professional at any point.  This ensures parties are not left to their own devices when considering challenging money questions.

Avoid shark attorneys who discourage mediation

Shark type attorneys will discourage you from mediating. They might tell you court is your only option. Be skeptical. If you have significant assets, they want your case. This serves their interests, not yours. They know they can make a ton more money if they can fight over your financial issues.

Don’t get sucked into a litigated case when you don’t need to. You might believe your case is so difficult, only a judge can sort things out. In today’s family courts, judges do not have the time to spend on complicated details. Those details important to you can be lost. A skilled mediator can handle any issue you present. Mediators take all the time you need to be sure you address and resolve each detail to your satisfaction.

Make sure your mediator possesses the training and experience necessary. When things get complicated, he or she should be willing to bring in additional experts. Ask whether he or she has worked with couples in circumstances similar to yours. Your mediator should be able to offer examples. Don’t work with someone getting on the job training during your case.

Read more about money and mediation:

Mediating Your Divorce When The Other Party Is a Bully

We Don’t Get Along Very Well. How Can We Possibly Mediate Our Divorce?

Will I Be Able to Keep the House?